Lamborghini Countach – When Outrageous Was Possible

There was a time when an art form known as coachbuilding existed. Back then, the coachbuilder did not have to answer to a CFO. Back then, the coach builder did not have to compromise his vision due to government regulations. Back then, the outrageous was possible. The Lamborghini Countach could only have been born then.

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There Are No Substitutes for a BMW E30 M3

There are no substitutes for an E30 M3, and for Gabor Mester, no ordinary M3 would cut it. Gabor had his heart set on the specific M3 that started him down the path of BMW: a car that belonged to the parents of a childhood friend. Walking through his friend’s garage one day and spotting this M3 instantly turned teenage Gabor into a car guy, who from that day forward took every possible opportunity to see and even wash the car. The dream of owning those ’80s flares, boxy lines, and a screaming S14 came true after many years (and a bit of convincing) when the car was ready to be handed to the next generation of E30 appreciators. Now Gabor’s E30 M3 love affair has been raging for seven years with no signs of stopping.

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These Datsun 240Zs Are Animals to Drive

The only thing rarer than the sight of a Datsun 240Z in the English countryside is the sight of two 240Zs in the English countryside. Spend enough time on the backroads of Kent, however, and chances are Mel Streek and his son, Ollie, will scream past you in their pair of Z cars.

Rest assured, you’ll have no trouble telling the two cars apart. The “Ratsun”–so nicknamed for its rough exterior–belongs to Mel, though after purchasing it he quickly found that he was seldom able to drive it because Ollie was always in it. This sent Ollie on a quest for a 240Z of his own, and he found it, in Copenhagen, in the form of a pristine 1973 model. This automotive odd couple can now be found barreling through the country lanes in tandem.

Not that having his own Z has stopped Ollie from eyeballing his dad’s car–he’d like to own both.… READ THE REST

1964 Ferrari 250 LM: A Le Mans Legacy

When Enzo opened the doors to Ferrari 70 years ago, he could have hardly imagined the motorsports empire he was beginning. Twenty years later, when he debuted the 250 LM, there wasn’t a doubt in the world that Ferrari was the pinnacle of design, style, and speed.

This is the story of one of those rare and very special race cars.

On October 7th and 8th, the wonders of Ferrari are being brought to New York City to celebrate 70 years of this Italian icon. To learn how you can participate, go to https://ferrari70nyc.com/

See the gallery and go behind the scenes of the making of this film: http://petro.li/250LMGallery

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The Ferrari 330 P4 is One Sexy Beast

As much as any other car, the Ferrari 330 P4 is the embodiment and culmination of an entire era of racing. With its low-slung stance and voluptuous lines, it is also among the most visually stunning cars ever produced. Combine these factors and the word “icon” slips to the tip of one’s tongue.

Still smarting from losing the Constructor’s International Sports Prototype Championship to Ford in 1965 and 1966 — and, in 1966, watching a trio of Ford GT40s finish 1-2-3 at Le Mans — Enzo Ferrari turned to his chief engineer, Mauro Forghieri, with a simple instruction: win. In world then dominated by Carroll Shelby and Ford’s formidable 7-liter engines, this would be no easy undertaking.

What resulted from Forghieri’s mandate was the 330 P4, arguably the greatest Ferrari endurance race car of all time. Based on the 330 P3 — and almost identical cosmetically — the 330 P4 represented a significant mechanical upgrade from anything Ferrari had run previously and, in 1967, it would return Ferrari to the pinnacle of sports prototype racing.… READ THE REST

Sir Stirling Moss and this Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR Remain Unbeaten

Few triumphs have inspired drivers like Sir Stirling Moss’ victory at the 1955 Mille Miglia. Then just 25 years old, driver Moss and co-driver Denis Jenkinson roared through 992 miles of Italian countryside in just 10 hours, 7 minutes and 48 seconds. Average speed? 98.53 miles per hour.

Here, Moss tells the story of his victory in his own words.

“Once the flag fell, I went flat out,” said Moss. “Obviously, when I’d see a car I caught up with, I really felt great about it, but I had no idea of the enormity of what it meant to myself because it’s really—it’s quite the thing to have on your CV.” Finishing ahead of the then-two times Grand Prix World Champion Juan Manuel Fangio, Moss’ achievement has long since been labeled “The greatest race”—a title that probably won’t be applied to any other motorsport event ever again. The 1955 Mille Miglia had it all: incredible drivers, now-iconic machines like the Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR #722, and a harrowing course that was dangerous beyond belief.… READ THE REST

The M1 Is BMW’s Solitary Supercar

“Fine, we’ll do it ourselves.”

If this isn’t stamped somewhere on the BMW M1, it surely should be. The car was originally conceived as a joint Lamborghini-BMW project that would produce a race car with enough street units to meet homologation rules for Group 4 racing. Trouble was, Lamborghini found itself in financial straits and the fellows up in Munich were thus left to finish the M1 on their own. What resulted was a Giugiaro-designed, mid-engined marvel that ended up being the fastest production car of its time.

Alas, by the time the M1 was ready to run, Group 4 rules had changed and BMW found itself with a car but without a race. And so, in 1979, the head of BMW Motorsport, Jochen Neerspach, conjured up a single-make championship that would use nothing but M1s. The BMW M1 ProCar Championship, which folded in 1980, may have been short-lived, but its flared-fendered M1s–driven by Formula One legends like Emerson Fittipaldi, Niki Lauda, Mario Andretti, Hans-Joachim Stuck, and Nelson Piquet–have become racing icons.… READ THE REST