Suspension lift

suspension lift is a modification to a vehicle to raise the ride height. It is usually done for the practical purpose of improving the off road performance of SUVs or trucks and other off-road vehicles, or for cosmetic purposes. Suspension lifts can enable steeper approach, departure, and breakover angles, higher ground clearance, and helps accommodate larger wheels and tires. Due to the raised center of gravity, maximum safe operating angles can be reduced and roadholding is often significantly impaired.

Truck with a suspension lift

lift kit is an aftermarket product package with the parts needed to lift a specific model of vehicle, typically with instructions and customer support. Some kits may have only critical or difficult to obtain parts, needing generic or off the shelf hardware and parts to complete the lift. Some lifts need only a few parts, like lift blocks, the spacers placed between the axles and leaf springs, and coil spring/strut spacers and extended shocks, and special driveshafts, axles, and more. More extensive lifts require many new suspension, steering, and drivetrain parts, such as replacement control arms, trailing arms, custom four-link systems, and drive shafts. These changes may be necessary because raising the vehicle’s ride height can impact drive shaft length, steering geometry, and brake lines. Legality is often an issue when installing suspension lifts, as many jurisdictions have varying laws on vehicle ride height and placement of lights and bumpers.

Leaf spring lift

Jeep Cherokee with 2 inch Suspension lift on 31 inch BFG A/Ts, using add-a-leaf and coil spring spacers

Many trucks are supported by leaf spring suspensions. Leaf springs offer exceptional articulation, a large payload and can take a substantial amount of abuse.[citation needed] With the correct methods they can be modified to help a vehicle carry more weight, have better articulation or to fit large oversized tires. Some vehicles may be equipped with front and rear leaf springs or just rear leaf springs with independent front suspension.

Some methods of lifting are good for the rear, but not for the front, such as lifting blocks. Lifting the rear with blocks is a common way to achieve the desired height. This is done by installing a block, of the desired height of lift, in between the leaf spring and leaf spring perch and installing longer U-bolts. It is a bad method for the front primarily because of safety issues while braking. When braking, the front wheels create the majority of the braking force. The block moves this lateral force, caused by braking, higher above the axle than it did in the stock form. This can cause the block to become displaced from its location and result in total loss of control.[1]

A more accepted way to build up the leaf springs is by using an add-a-leaf. This is done by inserting an extra leaf into the vehicle’s leaf pack. Using the add-a-leaf will increase the height, but sometimes makes the suspension ride rough because of the added spring rate.[2] With an adequate budget, the best way to lift with leaf springs is to buy a new set with the lift built in. An add-a-leaf depends on the integrity of the old springs. They may be a bit worn out, so when the lift is installed, the proposed 2 inch leaves may only have lifted the truck 1.5 inches. The new leaf spring pack will not be fatigued and will give the true lift desired. These packs can be bought at various increments of lift and can be combined with lifting shackles to give the proper setup.

Self-levelling suspension Self-levelling refers to an automobile suspension system that maintains a constant ride height of the vehicle above the road, regardless of load. Purpose Nose up, tail down attitude of vehicle without self-levelling suspension Many vehicle systems on a conventional vehicle are negatively affected by the change in attitude coming from changes in load - specifically a heavy load in the rear seat or luggage compartment. This change in attitude affects aerodynamic properties, headlight aim, braking, bumpers, shock absorption from the suspension and the vehicle's performance in a collision. Most of the braking power is on the front wheels of a vehicle, which means you will have more effective braking when more weight is over the front wheels. When the rear end has a heavy load, the braking is not as effective. The weight is concentrated on the rear end of the vehicle, and the rear brakes need to do all of the work. When braking quickly in this situation, the front br...
Suspension (vehicle) Suspension is the system of tires, tire air, springs, shock absorbers and linkages that connects a vehicle to its wheels and allows relative motion between the two. Suspension systems must support both roadholding/handling and ride quality, which are at odds with each other. The tuning of suspensions involves finding the right compromise. It is important for the suspension to keep the road wheel in contact with the road surface as much as possible, because all the road or ground forces acting on the vehicle do so through the contact patches of the tires. The suspension also protects the vehicle itself and any cargo or luggage from damage and wear. The design of front and rear suspension of a car may be different. The front suspension components of a Ford Model T. The rear suspension on a truck: a leaf spring. Part of car front suspension and steeringmechanism: tie rod, steering arm, king pin axis (using ball joints). ...
Height adjustable suspension Height adjustable suspension is a feature of certain automobile suspension systems that allow the motorist to vary the ride height or ground clearance. This can be done for various reasons including giving better ground clearance over rough terrain, a lower ground clearance to improve performance and fuel economy at high speed, or for stylistic reasons. Such a feature requires fairly sophisticated engineering. Citroën CX in high position. Height adjustment is most often achieved by air or oil compression used for the "springs" of the vehicle - when the pressure is varied - the vehicle body rises or lowers. Factory systems Height adjustable suspension from 1954 - high position An Audi A8 Multi Media Interface control screen for its Adaptive Air Suspension, which gives the vehicle clearance a range from 95 mm to 145 mm Kneeling bus in Dublin The first instance of a production vehicle with adjustable suspension was on the 1954 Citroën...
Multi-link suspension A multi-link suspension is a type of vehicle suspension design typically used in independent suspensions, using three or more lateral arms, and one or more longitudinal arms. A wider definition considers any independent suspensions having three control links or more multi-link suspensions. These arms do not have to be of equal length, and may be angled away from their "obvious" direction. It was first introduced in the late 1960s on the Mercedes-Benz C111 and later on their W201 and W124series. Typically each arm has a spherical joint (ball joint) or rubber bushing at each end. Consequently, they react to loads along their own length, in tension and compression, but not in bending. Some multi-links do use a trailing arm, control arm or wishbone, which has two bushings at one end. On a front suspension one of the lateral arms is replaced by the tie-rod, which connects the rack or steering box to the wheel hub. In order to simplify understanding, it is usual to consider the func...
Leaf spring A leaf spring is a simple form of spring commonly used for the suspension in wheeled vehicles. Originally called a laminated or carriage spring, and sometimes referred to as a semi-elliptical spring or cart spring, it is one of the oldest forms of springing, appearing on carriages in England after 1750 and from there migrating to France and Germany.   A traditional semi-elliptical Hotchkiss leaf spring arrangement. On the left, the spring is connected to the frame through a shackle. Leaf springs front independent suspension, front-wheel-drive Alvis1928 Independent front suspension by transverse leaf spring Humber 1935 Independent front suspension by semi-elliptical springs Mercedes Benz 230 W153 1938 Leaf spring on a German locomotive built by Orenstein-Koppel and Lübecker Maschinenbau A leaf spring takes the form of a slender arc-shaped length of spring steel of rectangular cross-section. I...